End of Month View: October

As October turns to November the garden is full of leaves and beech nuts, the light is Autumnal and the weather is very mild for the time of year.  It is a great time to be working in the garden.

These first few photos were taken in the middle of the October.

Azalia turns a lovely yellow

Azalia turns a lovely yellow

Round the side in October

Round the side in October

Dogwood  - the last leaves

The last few leaves hang off the Dogwood.

Over the next few weeks those last leaves fell.

So now the garden is looking bare with even more leaves on the ground.

Top corner of the garden

Top corner of the garden

A fern peeps out from under the leaves

A fern peeps out from under the leaves

The front - er - grass covered in beech leaves and nuts

The front – er – grass covered in leaves and nuts

This year we have had more nuts that we have seen in the previous twenty five years!

The long border

The long border from upstairs window

The long border is beginning to look bare, but you can see the lovely colour of the copper beech leaves at the back of the garden.

Top of Long Border

Top of Long Border

The plum tree is losing its leaves, but there are still some flowers on the Gaillardia , the Rubdbeckia , and the Erysimum. These have all been flowering for months.

Gaillardia Goblin

Gaillardia Goblin

Rudbeckia Little Goldstar and Erysimum Apricot Delight

Rudbeckia Little Goldstar and Erysimum Apricot Delight.

Moving down the border the silver foliage of Helychrisum Icicles is doing well after nearly disappearing in the cold winter of 2012.

Helichrysum Icicles

Helichrysum Icicles

And further round one stem of the Lobelia Cardinale makes a last stand.

Lobelia Cardinale

Lobelia Cardinale

There are some flowers that have not stopped performing since the spring,

Erysimum Bowles Mauve

Erysimum Bowles Mauve

Pink clump forming geranium

Pink clump forming geranium

And others that had a rest but are now having final flurry before winter.

Honeysuckle makes a bid for the sky

A single flowering branch of honeysuckle makes a bid for the sky – while the rest of it looks pretty dead.

Geum flowers again

A spring  flowering Geum blooms  again

Campanula unknown variety

As does this little campanula

Nasturtium Empress of India?

A new bloom on the Nasturtium Empress of India – most of these finished ages ago.

Some plants are just coming into flower for the first time this year.

Winter Jasmine

Winter Jasmine

Euphorbia.

Euphorbia (Black Pearl) finally flowers – shouldn’t it have done this in the Spring?

Elsewhere in the garden there are more beautiful colours.

The Persicaria Darjeeling Red lives up to its name

Persicaria Darjeeling Red

Persicaria Darjeeling Red

Persicaria Red Dragon

Persicaria Darjeeling Red

The cotinus leaves are turning bright red as if they are shining in the sunlight.

Cotinus leaves turning colour

Cotinus leaves turning colour

And a little cutting of a Chinese Virginia creeper has stunning new growth.

Parthenocissus henryana

Parthenocissus henryana

The garden still provides food to the wildlife:

Birds. . .

blackbird eats cotoneaster

Blackbird eats cotoneaster

And snails.

Rather tatty foxglove

Rather tatty foxglove

Meanwhile not to be outdone by Jenny of Duver Diaries-we also have a strawberry in November! Only a little Alpine one, but a strawberry none the less.

Strawberry in November

Strawberry in November

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17 thoughts on “End of Month View: October

  1. I love your Helychrisum Icicles, I ‘ ve not seen it before. Erysimums are so useful, they go on flowering so long. I like your Apricot Delight. I can never resist apricot flowers.
    My winter jasmine is in full bloom too. It is a bit early isn’ t it?

    • Thanks. Yes I am not sure how long mine will last – I am fully expecting it to be eaten when it starts to grow next Spring. However it was worth the money just for this year as it is such a brilliant red.

  2. Dear Annette, I’m so glad I’ve just found your lovely blog – it is really inspirational. Also, pardon my ignorance but can you please tell me the name of the plant with the wonderful orange berries in the header photo at the top of this page? Joanna

    • Hi Joanna,thanks for following my blog. I am glad I have found yours too – it is always interesting to read other Scottish blogs who have a similar climate. It looks as if you have been blogging the same time as myself too. I wonder if I have got a statistics email from WordPress somewhere. I do find them fascinating to look at though they have to be taken with a pinch of salt as at the end of the day it is the number of real friends you make that counts more than any number of occasional visitors.
      The plant with the orange berries is a Pyracantha. The berries are the best part of the plant but they don’t last long as they are adored by blackbirds. You can get varieties with lovely red berries too. A very prickly plant, but one worth growing if you have a spare wall or fence somewhere.

      • Thank you – it is beautiful and will almost certainly find its way onto my 2015 garden wishlist. And I’m always happy to encourage blackbirds into the garden even if they do gobble down the pretty berries! Happy Hogmanay, and I’m looking forward to following your Scottish gardening adventures.

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