Bottom hedge

Garden Bloggers Foliage Day

I am back in Aberdeen after a very wet stay at my sister’s down in the New Forest in Hampshire. Unfortunately her mother-in-law was in hospital following a stroke which meant a daily round trip of about 3 hours for visiting. I went down to help with some of the day to day stuff that was getting neglected.  Now, my priorities were not necessarily the same as my sister’s and I did manage to plant some spring bulbs both in the garden and in pots. I did feel some days that I would have been better planting rice as the soil is quite heavy clay – not good after continual rain. I do hope the bulbs survive.  Irene was making good progress when I left and will hopefully be home for Christmas and certainly in time to enjoy the bulbs in the Spring.

So on Friday it was back to an equally wet Aberdeen. I managed to get out briefly yesterday to take some GBFD photographs and plant a few more of my own bulbs.

At this time of the year the variegated shrubs really come into their own. I know they are not everyone’s cup of tea but when you have such a long dark winter you need all the brightness you can get in the garden.

Eleagnus 3 years old

Eleagnus 18 months  old

I have a very mature shrub of this same Eleagnus Maculata in the bottom hedge and it has been wonderful. I had a bit of trouble finding the same variety for the long border. It was put in as a very small shrub in April 2013  – see how much it has grown.

New Eleagnus Maculata

New Eleagnus Maculata

This rhododendron at the bottom end of the long border is also growing fast now I have given it some space.

Rhododendron Molten Gold

Rhododendron Molten Gold

And the boring white house wall benefits from some euonymous plants.

Euonymous

Euonymous

Everywhere the garden looks very yellow and brown, with most of the brown coming from fallen beech leaves.

Bottom hedge

Bottom hedge

But not all. . .

Astilbe leaves adding to the garden's brown tones

Astilbe leaves adding to the garden’s brown tones

The leaves provide a foil for some lovely green plants. .

Dryopteris Erythrosora

Dryopteris Erythrosora

Pinus Mugo Mops

Pinus Mugo Mops

The garden is not totally green, yellow and brown.  If you look hard you can find a bit of colour.

Cotoneaster Autumn colour

Cotoneaster Autumn colour

The cotoneaster leaves are a lovely shade of pink at the moment.

There is the odd pretty leaf on the cherry

Cherry leaf Autumn Colour

Cherry leaf Autumn Colour

And is the Nandina actually going to give us an Autumn display this year?

Nandina Domestica Firepower

Nandina Domestica Firepower

More reliable colour comes from the Cornus round the side.

Red Stemmed Cornus

Red Stemmed Cornus

And the Cotinus

Red Cotinus leaves

Red Cotinus leaves

Erica Arborea Albert's Gold

Erica Arborea Albert’s Gold has recovered.

My Erica Albert’s Gold has recovered from its lack of correct pruning in its early days and looks a lovely splash of green agains the dark leaved Escallonia Apple Blossom.

When you are desperate even the shrivelled leaves of the Echinops have a certain beauty.

Shrivelled leaf of Echinops

Shrivelled leaf of Echinops

Throughout the damp garden the mosses and lichens are growing very happily.

Moss on stone

Moss on stone

This will look so pretty in the Spring when those primroses are out.

Until then we can continue to enjoy foliage posts thanks to Christina’s Garden Blogger’s Foliage Days.

 

 

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14 thoughts on “Garden Bloggers Foliage Day

  1. I am not a great fan of variegated foliage but it is welcome in winter. I have a spotted laurel next to a variegated Euonymus fortunei ‘Emerald n Gold’ which I would never dream of planting, they were here when we came. But although in theory I don’ t like them, in winter they are really bright and sunny. Your Eleagnus is lovely and it is so useful for winter arrangements. Buttercup yellow is just what we need on these gloomy November days.

    • I didn’t think I liked variegated foliage either until I did an earlier post on it and realised how much I have in the garden! I think I prefer the gold coloured foliage to the silver one.

  2. Thank you very much for joining in GBFD this month; I knew someone would show me the colour Cotinus should be! Yours is lovely. Looking oking at your Nandina I thought at first it wan’t a Nandina at all the foliage is so very different from mine, but I checked on line and variety you have as yours. It says it is a dwarf variety so I imagine it grows even more slowly than the species.

    • I checked it out when I bought it a few years ago on a bargain bench. I think the priority was to find a protected spot for it in full sun as when I bought it it had been severely frost damaged. It has been really slow growing and isn’t supposed to get very big. Mind you I have had these dwarf varieties before and find they do not always stay small. I might need to move it nearer the front of the border though as it is a bit lost at the back.

    • Even so the garden always looks a bit bare in winter after the excesses of summer, but then we don’t go out into it very often so it doesn’t matter too much. Still no more colour on the nandina. . .but still hopeful.

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