Walking in South Tyrol. Part 2 – the mountains

In the Valli Di Casies there are walks for all abilities. The hotel kindly categorised their guided walks by number of boots: One boot was an easy walk whereas four boots required real commitment and fitness. We decided we would start at two boots and hopefully progress to three boots near the end of the holiday. We were not crazy enough to ever aspire to a four boot all day walk with lots of climbing.

Wooded signs guided our way

Wooded signs guided our way

We did about three guided walks as it was a great way to find out about the area and to meet other hotel guests. The rest of the days we set out on our own armed with maps and compass, full waterproof gear, walking sticks, bottles of water and chocolate.  You would think we were climbing Everest instead of walking up tracks! Still, I had been in the Girl Guides, and I knew you had to be prepared!

Mountain tracks

Mountain tracks

The weather was not brilliant, but still the views were spectacular and there is nothing that beats being surrounded by snow topped mountains, even if they are covered in cloud.

Low cloud over mountains

Low cloud over mountains

Mountain stream

Mountain stream

Mountains

Mountains

Snow capped peaks

Snow capped peaks

No, we weren’t really that close to the peaks – I just have a very good zoom lens on my camera!

We were here though.

The Uber Alm

The Uber Alm

This alm was owned by the hotel and one of the guided walks set off at 06.30 for breakfast in the mountains. We had to earn our food though by doing a ‘Salute to the Sun’ first.

Salute to the Sun

Salute to the Sun

Guess who is the only person doing it wrong! My excuse is that I don’t speak Italian!

Please come back for further posts – the next one is dear to my heart and will be on Alpine flowers.

Walking in the South Tyrol Part 1: The Valley

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25 thoughts on “Walking in South Tyrol. Part 2 – the mountains

    • I just love mountains. You could actually get to the ‘Sun Salutation’ place by road which was great for some people. The scenery does make all the effort worthwhile though.

  1. Glorious. We went for a walking holiday in Switzerland a few years ago. I’d really love to go back. The stunning scenery and beautiful clear air. I don’t think I’ve ever slept better, before or since.

  2. Pingback: Walking in the South Tyrol. Part 3 – The flowers. | My Aberdeen Garden

    • Yes, I loved Brownies and Guides, until they changed the whole syllabus just as I had nearly finished my Queen’s Guide! It threw me totally and I didn’t manage to get it. One of those things in life I clearly still regret – even more so because my friend still got hers! I remember so clearly the hours I put in trying to throw that rope up over the old Puffing Billy railway bridge.

      • What great memories of Girl Guides! There was a big change in syllabus on my end, too, although I finished my Canada Cord in Pathfinders before. I never did my Gold Cord in Guides – too busy with synchro at the time. I’m not sure what the Queen’s Guide is equivalent too? Maybe a combo of both the Gold and Canada cord? The Gold cord would have been finished around the age of 11 or 12 and the Canada Cord around the age of 14 or 15. I’m very curious about the rope throwing! What part of the challenge was that??

        • Queen’s Guide is the highest thing you could do in the actual Guides. I think you got to go to Buckingham Palace to receive it. Not sure if you actually met the Queen though. Can’t remember what the rope throwing was part of now, just one of the challenges we needed to achieve. We certainly had great times in Brownies and Guides – I loved the camping holidays.

          • Oh yes, the camping trips were my favorite as well. If I could go only camping, I would! I’ve heard of some units that did that. Were your camps more on the rustic side or did it depend how old you were? As for the Canada Cord presentation, the Lieutenant Governor (the Queen’s rep at the provincial level) had that honor.

          • Bell tents! I heard rumors that some were still around when I started camping but alas, none were to be found. Instead, we had the gigantic and probably equally heavy a-frame style canvas monoliths to be set up on the purpose built wooden platforms. I remember wowing younger campers with my folding skills with those darn things. And they were so finnicky with having to be carefully dried out before being put away, which was near impossible on cold, damp fall or early spring weekends. I was sad to hear this year that those canvas tents are no more at the camps I went to in the 80s and early 90s. I figured they would last forever.

          • Well of course we had it tough! Kids today have no idea! There is probably a museum somewhere with all our old tents! Like the science museum in London had all the old maths stuff I used in school – like log tables and slide rules. It was very strange.

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