Evergreen Shrubs

Choisya Ternata Sundance (2012)

Choisya Ternata Sundance

Choisya Ternata Sundance

Choisya is a lovely bright green evergreen shrub.  It is not totally hardy in a very cold winter, but normally recovers if damaged areas are cut back.  It is a slow growing, medium sized shrub.

Position: Sunny and sheltered,  but I have grown this is a shady spot.
Soil: Any
Care: 
Prune back any damaged stems.

RHS

Eleagnus Pungens Maculata

This is a great variegated evergreen shrub which is very easy to grow and look after.  It grows in any soil and in sun or shade. It can be pruned to stop it getting too large, but it can also fill quite a large space.  It will really brighten up your garden.

This is a new shrub we put in 6 months ago in Spring 2014.

Eleagnus 6 months old

Eleagnus 6 months old

This shrub is one of the oldest shrubs in our garden planted about 1990.

Eleagnus Pungens

Eleagnus ‘Maculata’ in hedge at bottom of garden

Mature shrubs can grow to 15 ft, but we keep ours at about 8 ft by regular pruning.  White fragrant flowers are supposed to appear mid to late Autumn followed by orange fruit, but can’t say I have ever noticed!  This mature shrub is planted in the shade so this is possibly the reason. I will wait in anticipation to see if the new shrub bears flowers as it is planted in full sun.

Position: Any
Soil: Any
Care: Prune out any green shoots to prevent loss of variegation.

More details

Euonymous Fortunii ‘Emerald N Gold’
(Pre 2010)

Euonymus growing up front wall

Euonymus growing up front wall

Position: Any
Soil: Well drained
Care: Prune out any green shoots to prevent loss of variegation.
WARNING: TOXIC if eaten

I have grown this plant in several places against the white walls of the house.  It is easy to split by finding a rooted sucker.

Ilex Crenata Golden Gem (2013)

Ilex Crenata

Ilex Crenata

I first put one of these in the bottom hedge where it grew quite happily despite not being in full sun. It has now got rather buried by larger shrubs as this is quite slow growing.  The second shrub I have put in the main herbaceous border to provide some winter colour.

Position: Full sun
Soil:  Any but well drained
Care: Easy to grow – not pruning necessary

RHS

Lonicera ‘Lemon Beauty’ (2013)

Lonicera lemon beauty

Lonicera lemon beauty

Position: Any
Soil: Any
Care: Prune out any green shoots to prevent loss of variegation.

This shrub was planted in the patio border near the house. It added a splash of colour to a new border, but I fear it may grow too bushy for this position.  I may move it to the top of the garden under the trees.

Lonicera ‘Baggessen’s Gold’
(1990 and 2012)

Position: Any
Soil: Any.
Care:  Prune in  Autumn to keep in shape

This green/yellow leaved variety of the box honeysuckle can be used as a large bushy shrub to fill a dark corner.  This was one of the first shrubs I put into the bottom hedge and it has made a lovely bright splash of colour every since. It is very easy to prune and keep in check.

I have never noticed any flowers or fruit on my shrub – maybe because I am always tidying it up – or maybe because they are so insignificant.

RHS

Photinia Fraseri ‘Red Robin’ (2012)

Photinia Red Robin

Photinia Red Robin

Position:  Sun or semi-shade
Soil: Fertile, moist and well drained
Care: Prune if required from spring to early Summer. Cut stems by about 6 inches pruning above an outward facing bud.  Young leaves can become damaged by wind and frost so you may consider wrapping in fleece over winter to preserve the lovely new red growth.

This shrub was planted in the sloping area near the drive to replace its predecessor that met a sticky end!  Unfortunately the first photinia had become rather leggy  and was snapped by a gale right at the base.

This second photinia is a better shape and was pruned early on to encourage a more bushy growth.

RHS

Pyracantha

Pyracantha early spring

Pyracantha early spring

Pyracantha is an ideal shrub for growing against a fence or wall.  It is difficult to prune only because it is so prickly!  It produces small white flowers in spring which do look rather messy when they die until the wonderful red or orange berries are produced in the winter.

pyracantha berries

pyracantha berries

However don’t get too fond of the berries as the birds will usually find them after a while.  Blackbirds are especially fond of these berries and will strip the branches bare.

pyracantha no berries

pyracantha no berries

Sarcococca Hookeriana Humilis (2013)

Sarcococca Humilis

Sarcococca Hookeriana Humilis

This shrub was planted at the top of the garden under trees as it should tolerate dry shade. This is a suckering evergreen so hopefully it will spread under the trees.
Very fragrant flowers should appear in spring.

Position: Shade or Part Shade
Soil: Any
Care: Prune after flowering if required.

RHS

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Evergreen Shrubs

  1. I have planted a Photinia and tried twice planting a Pyracantha. The Photinia is struggling a bit with leaves that are turning dark. I planted it early last month. It had been marked down half price, so I decide to try planting it. I’ve cut off a few of the lower limbs with leaves that were turning dark. Any suggestions on this? Finally, one of the Pyracanthas is looking pretty and will make it I think.

    • Hi Angie, thanks for visiting and following my blog.Pyracanthas are generally quite easy to grow in the UK, so hopefully it will do well for you too. The new shoots of Photinia can be a bit delicate in wind and cold, so I sometimes wrap mine in fleece for the winter here. What variety did you get as some are more fussy about soil type than others. Other than that, if it was a sale plant it might be a bit stressed and just take a bit of settling in. It will need quite a bit of water initially I would think. It is a shrub that you can prune quite a bit and it will just grow all the more so I wouldn’t worry about cutting off bits, so long as it doesn’t make new growth just before it turns cold. Good luck – I can’t resist sale plants either and sometimes I win and sometimes I don’t!

  2. Pingback: Natural Plants for High Desert Gardens | High Desert Blogging

Please leave a comment - I would love to hear from you.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s